Girl Scouts - At the Speed of a Girl

project type: fabrication , graphics , museums

Juliette Gordon Low organized the first Girl Scout meeting on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga. Two years later, North Carolina’s first troop met in Eden. By the 1920s, troops were springing up across the Tar Heel State. Today, nearly 70,000 North Carolina girls participate in Girl Scouts, the premier leadership organization for girls, with 3.2 million girl and adult members worldwide.

“At the Speed of A Girl” celebrates the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouting and tells the story of Girl Scouts and the contributions they continue to make in North Carolina. The exhibit installation, at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, is filled with a rich mixture of vibrant images, compelling artifacts, and personal stories told by prominent former Girl Scouts.

Of special note is a 1942 thank-you letter from First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt to Girl Scouts whom she met while visiting Raleigh. Mrs. Roosevelt came to the capital city when serving as one of the first honorary presidents of Girl Scouts. A photograph of the First Lady with Girl Scouts appears in the exhibit. Other items include antique camping equipment, Girl Scout craft projects, and scrapbooks filled with drawings and entries written by former scouts.

The design of the exhibit features rough-hewn wood posts juxtaposed against bold colors and vibrant images. A series of simple display cases are positioned around the gallery, with a large teepee shaped case in the center. Wallpaper mural and smaller image reproductions breath life into the great selection of historic photos. The exhibit was designed, built and installed by Design Dimension.

Design Dimension is proud and honored to be a part of this great milestone in the history of North Carolina’s Girl Scouts.